9 Common skin Cancer Myths you should aware of

9 Common skin Cancer Myths you should aware of

In the effort to defeat skin cancer, knowledge is the key weapon in your armoury. With the ample of supportive information gathered on the internet, many misconceptions also emerged and spread wrong insights about skin cancer associated causes, diagnosis and treatment. These myths are needed to quashed to guide people in the right direction for skincare.

Aiming to provide you better knowledge against this potentially deadly cancer type, we are debunking some of the most common myths about skin cancer:

Myth 1. People having dark skin color are not at risk of getting skin cancer
Myth 2. People who are exposed to sun only get skin cancer
Myth 3. You don’t require sunscreen on a cloudy or rainy day
Myth 4. Skin cancer only affects older people
Myth 5. Sunscreen once applied can work for a whole day
Myth 6. Safe tan doesn’t lead to skin cancer
Myth 7. Apply sunscreen just before going outdoors
Myth 8. All moles are cancerous
Myth 9. People living at high altitude have lower skin cancer risk

Myth 1. People having dark skin color are not at risk of getting skin cancer

However, it doesn’t mean these people are entirely safe from the skin cancer risk. Many times these people remain undetected until the later stage of skin cancer. This can be more dangerous. Whether you have a light or dark complexion, you must protect and care for your skin to reduce the risk of skin cancer.

Myth 2. People who are exposed to the sun only get skin cancer

Undoubtedly coming in direct contact with the sun constantly for many years can significantly increase the risk of skin cancer. Direct contact with the sun during peak hours, viz. from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. can cause more harm. Taking all the sun protection can prevent the damage from these rays.

However, sun rays are not the only culprit. Indoor means of UV exposure and tanning devices like sunlamps and tanning booths or beds also play a major role in causing skin cancer. People should take care of their skin and avoid using such devices.

Other risk factors like family history of skin cancer, other genetic mutations, and weakened immune system can also be the reason behind skin cancer.

Myth 3. You don’t require sunscreen on a cloudy or rainy day

Sunscreens are the best means to protect your skin from the harmful effects of UV rays. Effective sunscreens proficiently aid to reflect the UV rays.

However, there is no such rule that you only need to apply sunscreen during sunny days. The application of sunscreen is also important on rainy and cloudy days. These days sunlight is not in contact with your skin directly but UV rays are still in contact.

UV rays can penetrate the clouds and can reach you. So, you must wear sunscreen while going outdoors, no matter what the weather is.

Myth 4. Skin cancer only affects older people

It is not true, as one of the deadly form of skin cancer, melanoma is commonly detected in people younger than 30. Young women tend to suffer more than males from this cancer. Other than this, cancer that runs in families may also arise at a younger age.

Myth 5. Sunscreen once applied can work for the whole day

Sunscreen can work up to only for two hours. If you are outside for a longer time, you need to reapply sunscreen every two hours. Also, don’t forget to apply sunscreen properly and at sun exposed areas to protect your skin.

Myth 6. Safe tan doesn’t lead to skin cancer

According to experts, there is no such thing as safe tanning. Tanning and sunburn, both are signals of skin damage. Suntan increases your risk of basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma and melanoma (common types of skin cancer).

Myth 7. Apply sunscreen just before going outdoors

Sunscreen requires some time to absorb into the skin. If you apply sunscreen just before going outdoors, it may not fully absorb into the skin. In this case, you can’t get the benefit of sunscreen. So, always apply sunscreen 15 to 20 before going out in the sun.

Myth 8. All moles are cancerous

Mole develops on the skin when cells come together in one area. These moles can develop on different areas of the body and are little darker from skin color. Many moles are harmless, but some can cause the problem.

It is very essential to find whether a mole is cancerous or non-cancerous. Finding a cancerous mole at an early stage can protect you from skin cancer.

Follow this ABCDE guide to find a unhealthy mole:

  • Asymmetry: Healthy mole is symmetrical, whereas an unhealthy mole is asymmetrical.
  • Borders: Healthy moles form oval or circle shape and without any sharp edges, whereas unhealthy moles have uneven edges.
  • Color: Healthy moles are slightly brown or all of the same color. On the other hand, an unhealthy mole might of black or all of the different colors.
  • Diameter: Healthy mole is smaller than 6mm, whereas an unhealthy mole is bigger than 6 mm.
  • Evolving: Healthy mole never changes shape, size or colour, whereas an unhealthy mole does.

    If your mole turns out to be unhealthy, consult your physician.
Myth 9. People living at high altitude show lower skin cancer risk

With high altitudes, exposure to harmful sun radiations also increases. This can further result in skin damage.

Above 700 meters, the daily erythemal dose (quantity of UV rays that leads to minimal erythema (sunburn or redness) of the skin in a few hours of sun exposure), rises exponentially with increasing altitude.

These are some of the common myths associated with skin cancer. Don’t follow these misconceptions, be aware and protect your skin from the harmful deadly disease. If you feel something suspicious growing on your skin, some kind of abnormal mole or any patch, immediately consults your physician. Early detection can help to treat the problem from the roots and without any side effects. So, not only take care of outer skin’s beauty but also its internal health.

Like this, there are also some common myths regarding breast cancer. Must read these as well to keep your body healthy and fit.

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